Inauguration Day in America

Old Post Office in Washington, D.C. in 2009. Today, it is the home of the Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C.
I have loved politics ever since I was five, probably because I'm a political news junkie. At different times I've been a conservative Republican, an independent thinker, and a rather liberal Democrat. 

No, this is not a political blog (nor is it becoming one). And this is not intended to be a political post. It's just my recounting of a few of my favorite political memories: attending presidential inaugurations in both 2001 and 2009. They were different experiences and, today, I'm in a unique position as I am not attending an inaugural of a new president for the first time since 1993.

Enjoy!

Fun With Flags: Kentucky Edition

I'm kind of a flag nerd. I've always had a thing for flags. When I was little, I'd always get the flag for the state or country I was visiting. Sometimes, I'd even correct an improper flag display. And I love Dr. Sheldon Cooper Presents Fun With Flags segments on CBS' Big Bang Theory!

So when I saw the cover of today's Herald-Leader, I was excited to see the prominent display of the flag for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government prominently placed above the fold. And below the fold was the headline: "Does Lexington need a memorable city flag?"

The short answer is a resounding YES! But the longer answer is, of course, more interesting. The article notes two groups (Lexington firefighters and 8th graders at Lexington Christian Academy) that  are pushing for a new flag and promoting a few of their own designs.

The H-L article prompted me to watch an 18-minute TED talk by Roman Mars which I've embedded below.  Mars discusses the elements of a good flag and gives examples of both good and bad flags. Countries are pretty good at making strong banners, but American cities are pretty horrible at the task. Mars even featured Lexington's own flag as a "bad flag" example, which is what prompted the firefighters mentioned above to take on their effort.

What makes a good flag? According to the North American Vexillogical Association, or NMVA, (far bigger flag nerds than I), there are five key principles:
1. Keep it Simple
2. Use Meaningful Symbolism
3. Use 2 or 3 Basic Colors
4. No Lettering or Seals
5. Be Distinctive or Be Related.
All of this makes sense. In fact, these are pretty good design principles overall. So how do Kentucky flags stack up on this scale? The Kentucky flag itself is, like the Lexington flag, an SOB (seal on a bedsheet). It's just a blue background with the state seal on it. Pretty boring, indistinctive, and not simple (in that the details of the seal itself are complex).

Other cities in Kentucky vary...

Uncertain Fate for 1914 Neo-Classical Home in Nicholasville, Kentucky

At an auction yesterday, a century-old home on the south side of Nicholasville was auctioned off. The property located at 1201 South Main Street was advertised as including over 32 acres ripe for development. So the question is will this circa 1914 home be standing in a year (or even a month)?

The answer to that question is unknown.

So what is at risk of being demolished?

Then & Now: Impeachment in Kentucky

If you've followed local news in Kentucky the past few days, the word "impeachment" has come up more than once. It was front page news in Wednesday's news. (August 31, 2016). That's because of a news story out of Jessamine County. I'm not going to go into the issues on this site because there are plenty of news sites covering the story du jour. Let's just say that Kentucky is living up to its hype as the place where "politics [are] the damnedest."

Let's instead look at the historical side of impeachment in Kentucky. In 1991, the Legislative Research Commission published an Informational Bulletin entitled Impeachment in Kentucky "designed to assist future legislatures in conducting impeachments, and to provide the public with a look into the process itself."

Section 68 of Kentucky's 1891 Constitution provides that the "Governor and all civil officers" are subject to impeachment. Throughout the history of the Commonwealth, however, there have been only four impeachments. These are there stories.
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